Category Archives: Projects

Exporting to China

Ad Hoc Logistics recently assisted a New Hampshire manufacturer with a first-time export shipment to China. We advised the client the specific conditions requiring the importer of record to register with MOFCOM (Ministry of Commerce) and to obtain an import license.

For help with exports contact mitch@adhoclogistics.com

What is a Schedule B Code?

A couple of recent client projects involved research and advice about Schedule B codes used in AES  (Automated Export System) filings. Shippers often use Schedule B or Harmonized codes they have been given without understanding what the codes mean. The link shown below is to  FAQ’s at the export.gov website. These FAQ’s explain the difference between Schedule B and Harmonized codes pretty well so I won’t elaborate. As I usually explain to clients, Schedule B is for export from the US and Harmonized codes are for imports. Both are based on the HTS system in which the first 6 digits are universal. Importing countries can ( and do) use their own last 4 or 6 digits. So, since a US export is another country’s import, the Schedule B used for export may not match up exactly to the importing country’s harmonized code. As noted in a previous post, codes are updated annually so it is a good business practice to check and verify your data. Contact mitch@adhoclogistics.com if you need help. http://export.gov/faq/eg_main_017509.asp#P14_1006

Ad Hoc Logistics assisting electronics distributor

Ad Hoc Logistics is working with a MA electronics distributor to facilitate a complex import shipment from CN.We have researched several freight forwarders’ capabilities, advised on documentation, and arranged ocean transportation.

We can help your company be more productive. Let your shippers focus on packing and shipping. Ad Hoc Logistics can handle logistics details for you. Contact mitch@adhoclogistics.com

 

Incoterms Project

Ad Hoc Logistics is currently helping a client resolve a conflict between Incoterms and Liner terms. In this transaction the Incoterm used is incompatible with the Liner term resulting in a dispute over payment of some fees. Following is some basic info from a previous post about Incoterms.

For help with Incoterms contact mitch@adhoclogistics.com

Incoterms Basics

Incoterms are rules used to facilitate global trade. Incoterms were created and are administered by the International Chamber of Commerce and are updated every 10 years. Incoterms 2010 published by ICC Services Publications, Paris FR is a very good reference. Some of the important points covered in the book are:

  • Incoterms must be in the contract of sale to apply
  • > 120 countries have endorsed Incoterms 2010
  • Now 11 rules in 2 groups
  • 2 new rules deal with geographic place
  • Incoterms is not a law…older versions can be used as long as all parties agree
  • Incoterms replaces Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) in domestic commerce
  • for reference  www.iccbooksusa.com
  • Incoterms cover;
    • Who does what
    • Who pays for what
    • When risk of goods passes from seller to buyer
    • Who is responsible for insurance, export clearance, import clearance, and other costs pertaining to delivery of goods
  • Incoterms do not cover;
    • Ownership or title to goods
    • Payment terms
    • Detailed requirements
    • Complete contract of sale

Incoterms 2010 includes several rules changes:

  • Now referred to as rules not terms
  • Remove DAF DES DDU DEQ
  • New Rules  DAT DAP
  • 2 Groups…Any Mode and Ocean/Inland Waterway Only
  • Any Mode…EXW FCA CPT CIP DAT DAP DDP
  • Ocean or Inland Waterway Only…FAS FOB CFR CIF

Attached chart is a quick guide to Incoterms 2010

Incoterms 2010 Quick Reference Chart 120610

Fair Tide

Proud to say that I have joined the board of directors of Fair Tide. The mission of Fair Tide is to provide short-term affordable housing in a safe dignified setting for people who are homeless. With the help of the community, Fair Tide will provide advocacy, support and referrals to assist residents in their move toward permanent housing, financial stability and self-sufficiency.

 

info@ fairtide.org

 

 

The Value of Professional Certifications

Next week I will complete re-certification of my CTL (Certified Transportation and Logistics) thru AST&L (American Society of Transportation and Logistics). I believe that professional certifications are a valuable credential. Professionals prefer to do business with other professionals. Chances are if you are looking to hire an accountant, financial planner, or engineer, their credentials are important. Preference would go to the accountant who is a CPA, the financial planner who holds the CFP designation, and the engineer who has earned PE status. Why should the field of transportation and logistics be any different? Before discussing the CTL designation let me comment on certificate programs vs. professional certifications. Most of us have collected a number of certificates from attendance at seminars or training programs. These are all good but do not constitute professional certification. Some of the elements of a true professional certification are:

  • the certification is widely recognized in the field
  • certification is based on testing, research, or other measureable criteria
  • the certifying organization publishes and maintains professional standards of conduct
  • continuing education and/or re-certification is a requirement
  • the certification is “portable”, not tied to a specific company or location

The American Society of Transportation and Logistics (AST&L), founded in 1946, is the premier professional organization for transportation and logistics practitioners and educators. The Certified in Transportation and Logistics (CTL) certification is granted to individuals who successfully complete six exam modules. Three of the modules, Transportation Economics Management, Logistics Management, and International Transport and Logistics, are compulsory. The other three modules are elective and include more specific subject matter and a creative component. Exams are written and graded by well known educators to ensure academic integrity. In 2012, as a member of AST&L’s Education Committee, I participated in creating the CTL re-certification program. In order to maintain certification members must complete 45 hours of continuing education every three years. Credit is earned by various activities including: taking courses, teaching, writing articles, participating in webinars, and tutoring CTL candidates. The CTL is a worthwhile certification to have in the field of transportation and logistics. For info on the program contact AST&L at astl.org.

Recent Projects

Two recent projects involved a review of the parcel industry and an analysis of the customs broker industry with a focus on remote location filing. Both projects were for a major consulting firm.

 

 

Ad Hoc Logistics can help you control logistics costs and compliance with export and import regulations. Call 978 241-0324 or e mail mitch@adhoclogistics.com

Schedule B and Harmonized Codes

Ad Hoc Logistics is working with a New England engineering company to verify classification of commodities for export and the subject of Schedule B numbers and Harmonized codes came up for discussion. The link shown below is to  FAQ’s at the export.gov website. These FAQ’s explain the difference between Schedule B and Harmonized codes pretty well so I won’t elaborate. As I explained to the client, Schedule B is for export from the US and Harmonized codes are for imports. Both are based on the HTS system in which the first 6 digits are universal. Importing countries can ( and do) use their own last 4 or 6 digits. So, since a US export is another country’s import, the Schedule B used for export may not match up exactly to the importing country’s harmonized code. As noted in a previous post, codes are updated annually so it is a good business practice to check and verify your data. Let me know if you need help.

http://export.gov/faq/eg_main_017509.asp#P14_1006